Love that doth reign and live within my thought

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Love that doth reign and live within my thought

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Love, who lives and rules in my thought and holds his chief seat in my heart, sometimes armed comes into my face; and there makes camp and places his banner.

She who teaches me to love and suffer, and wants reason, shame, and respect restrain my great desire and burning hope takes offense inwardly at our ardor.

Therefore Love, fearful, flees to the heart, abandoning it all, and cries and shakes; he hides himself, and is seen abroad no more. What can I do, when my master is afraid, except stand with him to the bitter end?

He makes a fine end, who dies loving well!

Love that doth reign and live within my thought

Sir Thomas Wyatt Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey The long love that in my thought doth harbor, And in mine heart doth keep his residence, Into my face presseth with bold pretense And therein campeth, spreading his banner. What may I do, when my master feareth, But in the field with him to live and die?

For good is the life ending faithfully. Love, that doth reign and live within my thought, And built his seat within my captive breast, Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought, Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.

But she that taught me love and suffer pain, My doubtful hope and eke my hot desire With shamefast look to shadow and refrain, Her smiling grace converteth straight to ire. And coward Love, then, to the heart apace Taketh his flight, where he doth lurk and plain, His purpose lost, and dare not show his face.

For my lord's guilt thus faultless bide I pain, Yet from my lord shall not my foot remove: Sweet is the death that taketh end by love. Accordingly they involve the same basic narrative content, the same central metaphor, and the same overall structure.

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They are built around the conceit of love as a warrior or knight, who, in the octave, makes bold to declare himself through a blush, and is promptly rebuked by the beloved; the sestet finds him running away to hide, leaving the poet to reflect on his plight as a faithful servant of a cowardly master.

He can condescendingly paint this personified love as a blustery miles gloriosus one moment and a coward the next, while at the same time depicting himself as the constant but hapless servant, bound willy-nilly to attend a capricious master.

Nor are we meant to be. In the process, we wind up laughing along with the poet. By letting us in on the joke, he turns it into an occasion for amusement and light reflection. Petrarch has accomplished this multilayered sleight-of-hand by using a complex poetic structure that any translator will disregard to his cost.

The first and second halves of the octave are connected by a remarkable responsion at every level: They are virtually identical in order of presentation: In the sestet we meet a cascade of verbs: The sestet is linked to the octave, too, by a deft internal correspondence: The final three lines are superficially reflective and withdrawn, even self-mocking: The situation seems indeed hopeless, but not humorless: There is a potential for a certain amount of bittersweet self-deprecation here.

It is not entirely disingenuous, but neither should it be taken at face value. The continuing charm of the poem depends on this equipoise. The translators, as well, have either captured or reinvented much of this structural byplay.

An Interactive History of English Literature

Both step back in the final three lines, and assume a less hurried, more reflective and mock-philosophical tone. Nevertheless, not all the worth of these English versions is borrowed glory: By an accumulation of subtle variations, moreover, the two translators, constrained as they may be by their model, have taken their basic materials in different directions.

The cumulative impact of their variations is striking — to the point that the careful reader will get a very different sense of the events behind the metaphor.

The first distinction has to do with the overall aspect of the narrative: Surrey has almost certainly placed it here to convey his correct understanding of the word talor in the original cf.earl of Surrey (ca. ) Surrey's "Love that doth reign and live within my thought" is a translation of Petrarch's sonnet of Canzoniere.

In translating Petrarch's SoNNET, Surrey has changed the rhyme to take the English sonnet form. Love that doth reign and live within my thought / And built his seat within my captive breast, / Clad in arms wherein with me he fought, / Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.

The poem "The Long Love That in My Thought Doth Harbour" by Wyatt essentially depicts one view on love while the poem "Love That Doth Reign and Live Within My Thought" by Surrey, depicts an almost contrasting view.

Feb 04,  · The poem “The Long Love That in My Thought Doth Harbour” by Wyatt essentially depicts one view on love while the poem “Love That Doth Reign and Live Within My Thought” by Surrey, depicts an almost contrasting monstermanfilm.com: Resolved.

Love that Doth Reign and Live. Love that doth reign and live within my thought And built his seat within my captive breast, Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought, Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.

But she that taught me love and suffer pain, My doubtful hope and eke my hot desire. 1 Love that doth Reign and Live Within My Thought Henry Howard Earl of Surrey from ENG at Al-Imam Mohamed Ibn Saud Islamic University%(1).

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey